#AtTheBar Episode 6: Amy de la Force – Content Challenges | Creating Content

Join Mike Pritchett, CEO Shootsta and Amy de la Force, Head of Content at Switched On Media in the October Edition of At The Bar.

Episode 2 of 4

Transcript

Mike:
Welcome back to week 2 of our At the Bar series with Amy de la Force. If you missed last week, you’ll have to tune in and watch it, some great insights there. So, Amy welcome back!

Amy:
Cheers!

Mike:
So, Tell us a little bit about a challenging time in your career and how you came through and what you got out of it.

Amy:
When thinking about the most challenging times, it’s pretty much been whenever I’ve had to start something new. I think the key there has always been asking a lot of questions which particularly at work I’m kind of famous for [laughs].

Mike:
Better to ask than not know.

Amy:
Exactly! But yeah, being very curious, finding out what keeps key stakeholders up at night, what success looks like to them…

Mike:
I imagine that it would be very different from a company like Apple compared to being on the agency side?

Amy:
Some things are different, but there are some things that are quite similar. Even at Apple, it was very fast paced. So, making the transition to an agency wasn’t so difficult.

Having a really good understanding of what the business requires both client and agency side that’s massive. If you don’t have the information to understand those things, then it really inhibits your ability to make smart business decisions.

From thinking about the problems that I see the most, its around processes. Particularly around content creation, you tend to get two type of blocks; It’s either a creative block of ‘I don’t know what to write about, I don’t have any ideas or enough ideas, or I don’t have good enough ideas…’ Or you get the side where the approval process is something that hasn’t really been nutted out, and it’s difficult to manage.

Mike:
So when you do have a good idea…

Amy:
[Laughs]

Mike:
I suppose on the client side, so thinking back to your ‘Apple hat’, it is something that we find clients generally do find it difficult to come up with these ideas and to have that creative flow. Any tips?

Amy:
There are two things.

There is obviously the creative side of things around ‘I need to have this great amazing idea and it needs to be impactful, and it needs to add value, how’s that going to work?’ But, for me, one of the best things you can do is arm yourself with all of the information you need prior.

Mike:
It’s a great answer, and I threw straight to alcohol for creativity, and you brought it back to a reasonable business level, well done!

On that note, and great segway into it. Credibility and authority in the marketplace, what should brands be doing to gain and keep that credibility?

Amy:
I guess roofing off what I just said about understanding your audience; I think it’s a big key there. Building those first brand relationships. From a content marketing perspective, a lot of the way you go about that is by figuring out what people are looking for, how your brand can provide answers that are relevant to them and help them in some way. For example, how you can do something that previously you might have done as just an infographic, but how you make that interactive and fun, maybe a bit choose your own adventure.

Mike:
Now we move on to Talina’s would you rather. Would you rather be Google and answer everyone’s questions with only your current knowledge or be trapped in Kanye West’s phone?

Amy:
I’m not a mad fan of Kanye West, so I’m probably erring away from the second option towards the first option by default. Although, I think the question wording is quite funny!

Mike:
Nice, so I think we should just ask you random questions then. The population of the Himalayan region in 1782?

Amy:
I’m really terrible at that type of stuff, populations and geography are like not my strong points.

Mike:
We’ll just have a drink instead! Thank you so much!

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